“One of the hardiest and most nutritious legumes is ball clover. It grows from the top to the bottom of the hill.”

Larry Redmon
Extension Forage Specialist
Texas A&M Agricultural Research Center
 

“I had good luck with the ball clover at several locations this past year, despite the dry weather conditions. I didn’t take any yield data, but the stands were quite good in most of the locations.”

Dr. Ed Twidwell
Professor, LSU Dept. of Agronomy
 

“Even with the drought after Katrina, the Ball Clover emerged well and came on very fast in Central MS. This is the most hardy forage I have used in a long time, it works well in my low maintenance system, and has stood up to the abuse that I can put a forage through. Dollar for dollar, it out performed the two other clovers I planted last year. I will only plant Ball from now on.”

Ron Ladner
Field Representative
Tallgrass Beef Company, LLC
 

“The ball clover was planted last fall by Kevin Campbell, a FL county agent located near the Georgia/Florida line. He planted in a bahia grass field and has been very pleased with the performance of the ball clover. The site was a little sandy, but even so, the clover performed well across the field (best of course in low, wetter areas).”

Dr. John Andrae
Extension Agronomist, Forages
The University of Georgia
 

“The Ball Clover planted in south Louisiana this year is doing very well. Roy Laborde and myself each planted some seed along with ryegrass. Roy planted/over-seeded one area with just the Ball. It looks great. We both plan to use the clover again next year.”

Stuart Gardner
NRCS Area II Range Conservationist
Lafayette, LA
 

What I like about Grazer’s Select ball clover is I don’t have to worry about grazing it to get it to come back every year. I have had Crimsom and LA-S1 in my pastures before and even with careful management I still had to reseed every 3 or 4 years to keep a good stand. I have had Grazer’s Select ball clover in my hay fields for over 3 years and still cut 2 large round bales per acre without any additional fertilizer.

Wesley Mccasland
Troop, Texas

 

About this time last year, I contacted our local extension office for suggestions on reseeding winter annuals to be used for foraging by our cattle in South Carolina.  Kevin Campbell (forage specialist with Clemson University Extension) got some seed from y’all to try on our farm in Jackson, SC.  I wanted to contact you to let you know that I was amazed by the ball clover.  First and foremost, the cattle love it.  I am also impressed with the recovery that the plant shows with its re-growth after each grazing period.  I am looking forward to next spring to see how much reseeding has occurred.  We were so pleased with the performance, that we had the local cattlemen’s association over for a field day 2 weeks ago. 

Neely Page
A&W Farms
Jackson, SC

 








 

“Ball clover has been a major contributor to our grazing program for a number of years. It has extended our grazing season which amounts to more pounds of gain per acre. Being forage-based, we highly value your clover in our operation.”

Doug Rogers
Manager, Rogers Bar HR
Collins, MS
 

“We got a real good stand of Ball Clover on basically new cutover ground. The clover was very palatable and cows did real well on it. It out-performed the ryegrass that was planted with it. I would highly recommend Ball Clover in a forage program.”

Dr. Jim Anderson, DVM
Kenilworth Farms
Carthage, MS
 

“Our first introduction to Ball Clover was in the fall of 2004. We got excellent grazing and, the best thing about it, it reseeded so well that our stand was even better the second year. I totally believe in this clover as an asset to the cattle producer. We plan to plant more in the future.”

Shelby Beason
Philadelphia, MS


“Here are my results with Ball clover in pretty nasty clay, poorly drained soil near Pine Hill, Alabama. The turkey and deer love it, and I am one happy hunter!

 

Jon Nagel
 

 

Hi, I am a first time user of Grazer’s Select brand ball clover, and I am very pleased with the results. The clover was overseeded on 11-14-08 in fields of Bermuda and Pensacola grass. The clover started coming up in mid-February, and it has reached 20" by the first of April.

The goats and cows are doing very well on the clover and I am very pleased with how the clover has turned out. I am going to plant Grazer’s Select brand ball clover on the rest of my pasture land.

Thank you for being very helpful when I call for questions.

Shane Hesterman
Brocklyn, MS

www.deepsouthkikos.com

 

I was able to graze my Grazer’s Select ball clover until May 1st. The cattle were removed and the clover was allowed to make enough seed to reseed the following year. It was cut for hay on May 27th and yielded two 4x5-1/2 foot round bales with a crude protein of 16.9% and a 62.3% TDN. My calves like this hay better than anything else I am feeding.

Ed Pickard
Fannin County, Texas


I was able to graze my Grazer’s Select ball clover until May 1st. The cattle were removed and the clover was allowed to make enough seed to reseed the following year. It was cut for hay on May 27th and yielded two 4x5-1/2 foot round bales with a crude protein of 16.9% and a 62.3% TDN. My calves like this hay better than anything else I am feeding.

Ed Pickard
Fannin County, Texas